Constitution for Scotland Public Consultation Hub

Section 8.4. The Central Bank of Scotland is the executive arm of the Constitutional Monetary Authority and will originate the currency and regulate its distribution through the Full Reserve banking system.

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Original Version

  • Avatar admin
    Administrator #1  •  2020-08-20 17:48:26

    Section 8.4. Section 8.4. The Central Bank of Scotland is the executive arm of the Constitutional Monetary Authority and will originate the currency and regulate its distribution through the Full Reserve banking system.

      • Jim Osborne

        Section 8.4. This would be a complete disaster for an independent Scotland. A proposal that Scotland's monetary system should be based on Full Reserve banking is based on a flawed understanding about how modern monetary systems function in sovereign countries with their own currency and central bank.

          • Arfem

            Section 8.4. No flawed understanding – just a different perception of the present arrangements. Scotland is starting from scratch and you quote no reason why we cannot be financially independent – and please spare us the Establishment gobbledegook and let’s start thinking for ourselves for the first time since Adam Smith.

              • Jim Osborne

                Section 8.4. I haven't argued Scotland can't be financially independent - I believe very strongly to the contrary but full reserve banking leads to a fixed money supply. You need to explain where, in your analysis, money comes from.

                No responses
              • Tim Rideout

                Section 8.4. There is no such thing as a full reserve bank because if it keeps 100% reserves against the liabilities (deposits) then it is impossible to lend. As such it is then not a bank. It might be a safety deposit and payments institution but that would be all. No country in the world has tried this for very good reason. What you would end up doing is having all loans being provided by the central bank. To do the change you would have to nationalise all existing loans which would be the biggest hand-out to the existing bankers ever contemplated.

                  • Arfem

                    Section 8.4. In monetary circles the term ‘full reserve’ means lending no more than has been deposited or invested in equity. Pre the 1986 Thatcher/Reagan deregulation UK Building Societies were such and provided over 70% of total UK lending. The TSB, Airdrie Bank were also full reserve as are the German Sparkassen and many others still important institutions throughout the world

                      • Julian Smith

                        Section 8.4. “Full reserve banking” in the Original Version of this Section is a generic term covering a wide variety of financial institutions worldwide – Building Societies, Credit Unions, the U.S. Savings & Loans, the German Sparkassen & Landesbanken, the Swiss Canton Banks – all have their individual charters & government regulation but all have one feature in common – they are not fractional reserve and are true intermediaries required to match loanable funds deposited to genuine private & commercial borrowers. Similarly Constitutional Money is a generic term embracing any sovereign or State monetary issue.
                        A Constitution cannot specify detail – only principles.

                        No responses

Proposed Amendment to Section 8.4.

  • Tim Rideout

    Central Bank

    Section 8.4. The Scottish Reserve Bank shall be established by Parliament as the Central Bank of Scotland. The Scottish Reserve Bank shall be under the control of the Government and shall at all times be answerable to Parliament.

    4 votes  |  I agree 2 I disagree 2
    No responses

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