Constitution for Scotland Public Consultation Hub

Section 4.10. All persons, with a minimum of five years’ work experience outwith the political field and eligible to vote in elections for the Scottish Parliament, are eligible to stand for election to Parliament. No person who holds executive, administrative, military, diplomatic or judicial public office (other than Ministerial office) may be elected to Parliament unless they resign from the incompatible office. All candidates for election will be selected at constituency level.

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Original Version

  • Avatar admin
    Administrator #1  •  2020-08-20 17:40:47

    Section 4.10. Section 4.10. All persons, with a minimum of five years’ work experience outwith the political field and eligible to vote in elections for the Scottish Parliament, are eligible to stand for election to Parliament. No person who holds executive, administrative, military, diplomatic or judicial public office (other than Ministerial office) may be elected to Parliament unless they resign from the incompatible office. All candidates for election will be selected at constituency level.

      • Caledonialan

        Section 4.10. It might be possible to provide for leave of absence from an incompatible office, for the duration of the elected mandate, rather than resignation

        No responses
      • Caledonialan

        Section 4.10. The reference to selection of candidates presupposes a party system, but it should be possible for independent candidates to stand for election without any selection process.

        No responses
      • Caledonialan

        Section 4.10. The parenthesis "(other than Ministerial office)" might also be reconsidered. In the UK and Scottish parliaments, it is considered axiomatic that ministers be members of parliament. In France, the approach is somewhat different. A member of the French national assembly who is appointed minister relinquishes his or her seat to a deputy, who has full time to represent the constituency, for the duration of the ministerial mandate. Ministers may appear and speak before the national assembly, but do not take part in voting. Thus ministers and constituency representatives both have full-time, but completely separate, jobs. This is a model worth considering.

        No responses
      • finlay1980

        Section 4.10. What constitutes work experience in the political field? Trades union? grassroots campaigning? Setting up and running a charity? Writing a book? all of these could be considered 'political field', but doesn't mean that those individuals should be excluded from standing for election. I think putting restrictions on any person who is eligible to vote is in danger of being profoundly undemocratic. I understand the sentiment behind this, and it would be right to require candidates to relinquish certain roles, or to be resident in the country, or to be of voting age etc, but the principle of the constitution is about democracy and sovereignty remaining with the people who vote. What if a government chose to introduce a policy which directly affected people aged 16 to 21 (e.g. a university education tax, or military service). The voters affected would be unable to stand for election to counter such policies.

          • Diane Redhead

            Section 4.10. Any constraint (other than criminal offences) is an attempt to lock the future to the past. If Greta Thunberg was Scottish I would be happy to vote for her as soon as she was old enough.

            No responses
      • Miles

        Section 4.10. Comments I make earlier will override some of the above, if they are accepted. Surely, if it is with the people of Scotland to choose democratically who represent them then putting a five years limit on it is not only discriminatory against school leavers and young people but also takes a potential candidate option out of their hands? If a citizen wants to vote for someone to represent them who has work experience in the political field or who has been unemployed for one reason or another then they should have that option. They can decide to give their vote to someone else if they deem the five year minimum work experience a priority for them. Also, a host of issues around what is deemed as 'work experience'; paid work only, voluntary activities, disability, student etc.

        No responses
      • Albanach

        Section 4.10. I do not know how feasible this would be, but having viewed with dismay the level of corruption in other governments, I propose that some mechanism be incorporated into the Constitution to sever the link between material wealth and political power. All candidates for political office should be required to declare financial assets and interests, and a threshold put in place to disqualify those with excessive wealth from certain political offices.

        No responses

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